If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Anhydrobiosis: An Unsolved Problem

John H. Crowe
The American Naturalist
Vol. 105, No. 946 (Nov. - Dec., 1971), pp. 563-573
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2459752
Page Count: 11
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Anhydrobiosis: An Unsolved Problem
Preview not available

Abstract

The reversible cessation of metabolism and growth is a unique biological state. There are two types of organisms which are normally capable of of entering this state (cryptobiosis): (1) propagules of certain organisms and (2) certain rotifers, tardigrades, and nematodes. The latter group of organisms offer a unique opportunity to study the discontinuity of life processes, uncomplicated by simultaneous developmental processes and complex endogenous factors such as those responsible for the maintenance of dormancy. Working hypotheses and lines of research are pointed out in the areas of (1) metabolism during anhydrobiosis, (2) biochemical adaptations to desiccation, (3) morphological adaptations to desiccation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563
  • Thumbnail: Page 
564
    564
  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
567
    567
  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568
  • Thumbnail: Page 
569
    569
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571
  • Thumbnail: Page 
572
    572
  • Thumbnail: Page 
573
    573