Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Effects of Sperm Competition on Variability in Male Reproductive Success: Some Preliminary Analyses

P. L. Schwagmeyer, Kathy Ann Coggins and Timothy C. Lamey
The American Naturalist
Vol. 130, No. 4 (Oct., 1987), pp. 485-492
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2461699
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effects of Sperm Competition on Variability in Male Reproductive Success: Some Preliminary Analyses
Preview not available

Abstract

Computer simulations were used to explore the influence of sperm- competition outcomes on variability in male reproductive success. The results indicate that in polygynous mating systems, sperm competition per se does not necessarily affect variation in male reproductive success. Specifically, when all matings by males confer equal opportunities for fertilization, variability in reproductive success is unchanged by the routine occurrence of sperm competition. By contrast, sperm competition that results in fertilization skewed toward either the first or last male to copulate is capable of magnifying variability in male reproductive success. This effect may be limited to situations in which a correspondence exists between the number of mates acquired by individual males and the proportion of those matings that are of the advantageous type, that is, to situations in which males having high success in precopulatory competition also tend to prevail in sperm competition.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[485]
    [485]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
486
    486
  • Thumbnail: Page 
487
    487
  • Thumbnail: Page 
488
    488
  • Thumbnail: Page 
489
    489
  • Thumbnail: Page 
490
    490
  • Thumbnail: Page 
491
    491
  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492