Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Nest Predation Among Vegetation Layers and Habitat Types: Revising the Dogmas

Thomas E. Martin
The American Naturalist
Vol. 141, No. 6 (Jun., 1993), pp. 897-913
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2462845
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Nest Predation Among Vegetation Layers and Habitat Types: Revising the Dogmas
Preview not available

Abstract

Greater nest predation rates on ground-nesting birds than on off-ground-nesting birds have long been assumed and used as an explanation for patterns such as greater cryptic and monomorphic coloration of ground-nesting birds and for area sensitivity and population decline of many Neotropical migrant species. I use three independent data sets to show that this assumption is not true in forest habitats, where nest predation is instead least on ground-nesting birds. Larger clutch sizes and longer nestling periods of ground-nesting species in forest habitats are indirect evidence that ground-nesting species in forest habitats have suffered lower nest predation over evolutionary time. In contrast, ground-nesting birds seem to suffer greater predation than off-ground-nesting species in shrub and grassland habitats, but evaluation of predation is complicated by habitat disturbance in many studies. Nesting mortality in general appears to be greater in shrub and grassland habitats, and species in these habitats are showing some of the most consistent long-term population declines. Additional examination of nesting mortality of coexisting species in various ecological conditions is needed to uncover patterns that may influence evolution of life-history traits and population demographies.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[897]
    [897]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
898
    898
  • Thumbnail: Page 
899
    899
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[900]
    [900]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
901
    901
  • Thumbnail: Page 
902
    902
  • Thumbnail: Page 
903
    903
  • Thumbnail: Page 
904
    904
  • Thumbnail: Page 
905
    905
  • Thumbnail: Page 
906
    906
  • Thumbnail: Page 
907
    907
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[908]
    [908]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
909
    909
  • Thumbnail: Page 
910
    910
  • Thumbnail: Page 
911
    911
  • Thumbnail: Page 
912
    912
  • Thumbnail: Page 
913
    913