Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Postneonatal Mortality Surveillance — United States, 1980–1994

Cheryl L. Scott, Solomon Iyasu, Diane Rowley and Hani K. Atrash
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: Surveillance Summaries
Vol. 47, No. SS-2 (July 3, 1998), pp. 15-30
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24676394
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Postneonatal Mortality Surveillance — United States, 1980–1994
Preview not available

Abstract

Problem/Condition: This report contains public health surveillance data that describe trends in postneonatal mortality (PNM) and that update information published in 1991. Reporting Period Covered: 1980–1994. Description of System: National death certificate data characterizing PNM were reported by hospital physicians, coroners, and medical examiners. Data for 1980–1994 were compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and obtained from NCHS public-use mortality tapes. Results: The PNM rate per 1,000 live births declined 29.8% from 4.1 in 1980 to 2.9 in 1994 (31.7% decline among white infants and 25.8% among black). Most of the decline resulted from reduced mortality from infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The PNM rate for blacks remained steady at 2.1/1,000 live births during 1985–1988 and gradually increased to 2.4 by 1994. Autopsy rates for cases of SIDS increased from 82% to approximately 95% and did not differ among black infants and white infants. The decline of PNM rates for birth defects was greater for white infants than for black infants. The racial gap in PNM rates widened regionally during the study period, except in the South and the Northeast where ratios remained stable. In 1994, the largest gap persisted in the north-central region followed by the West and North-east. Interpretation: In 1994 as in 1980, PNM remained an important contributor to infant mortality, but nearly half of these deaths are caused by potentially preventable causes such as SIDS, infections, and injuries. The use of interventions for SIDS, birth defects, infections, and injuries can help reduce PNM and narrow the associated racial gap. Actions Taken: This surveillance information, which will be distributed to administrators of state maternal and child health programs and to community-based organizations nationwide, will be useful in planning infant mortality reduction programs and to target PNM prevention efforts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30