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Relation of Desiccating Winds to Fluctuations in Ash Content of Citrus Leaves and Phenomenon of Mottle-Leaf

A. R. C. Haas and H. S. Reed
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 83, No. 2 (Apr., 1927), pp. 161-172
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2470905
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Relation of Desiccating Winds to Fluctuations in Ash Content of Citrus Leaves and Phenomenon of Mottle-Leaf
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Abstract

1. The effect of desiccating winds upon citrus leaves was shown by their high transpiration and wilting. Analyses here reported show that there was a temporary accumulation of salts in the leaves accompanying excessive transpiration. The excess salt content of leaves which survived the windstorms disappeared during subsequent calm weather. There appeared to be an intimate relation between climatic conditions and salt content of leaves. The increased concentration of salt in the leaves appeared to be due largely to the increase in calcium. 2. The increase in salt content of the leaves was mainly due to an increase in the water soluble portion, especially that of calcium. It appeared that the increased salt content of the leaves was of value in protecting them from excessive evaporation, and emphasized the dynamic equilibrium between the leaf cell and its environment. 3. The loss of calcium through wind defoliation was inferred from the mottled condition of the next set of leaves, and the loss of organic nutrients such as carbohydrates and proteins was inferred from the small size of the subsequently formed leaves. In later cycles of growth the shoots produced healthy large leaves. 4. The larger amounts of insoluble nitrogen found in injured leaves made it probable that the desiccating wind had produced injury by coagulating the proteins of the leaf cells.

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