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Growth of Three Varieties of Lilium from Bulbs Stored in Vapors of Methyl Ester of Naphthaleneacetic Acid

R. M. Acker
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 111, No. 1 (Sep., 1949), pp. 21-35
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2472874
Page Count: 15
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Growth of Three Varieties of Lilium from Bulbs Stored in Vapors of Methyl Ester of Naphthaleneacetic Acid
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Abstract

1. Bulbs of Easter lily, var. Estate, Easter lily, var. Croft, and Regal lily were packed in wooden boxes with shredded newspaper previously treated with the methyl ester of naphthaleneacetic acid (MENA) to provide concentrations of 0.0, 0.062, 0.62, or 6.2 gm. of growth-regulator per cubic foot of storage space. The boxes were then stored at 34⚬ F. or, in some cases, later transferred to 50⚬ F. Observations were made during storage and later after the bulbs were planted in the greenhouse or garden. At flowering time dry weight of tops, height, blooming time, size and number of flowers per plant, and weight of bulblets were usually obtained. 2. In one experiment Croft and Estate bulbs were stored at 34⚬ F. One-third of each type of bulb was planted in the greenhouse 54 days later; another one-third after 91 days; and the remainder 129 days after storing. Plants from bulbs treated with the two lower concentrations of MENA flowered 2 weeks earlier than controls at all plantings. Plants from bulbs treated with 0.062 or 0.62 gm. of MENA per cubic foot in the second and third plantings produced greater dry weight of shoots and larger flowers than the controls. In all Croft plantings a greater number of bulblets was produced on the plants previously treated with 0.62 or 6.2 gm. of the growth-regulator. 3. In a second experiment, Regal bulbs were stored in MENA at 34⚬ F. for 108, 149, or 156 days, but they were all planted at the same time in the garden. Plants of all treatments grew at about the same rate, except that those from bulbs previously treated with the highest rate of MENA were stunted. The longer period of time bulbs were exposed to the highest rate of growth-regulator, the greater was the stunting. The two lower treatments of MENA greatly stimulated root production. The highest rate of MENA resulted in the production of many roots, but these were fasciated and greatly thickened and tumor-like. 4. In a third experiment, Estate, Croft, and Regal lily bulbs were stored in MENA for 48 days at 34⚬ F. and for 59 days at 50⚬ F. Bulbs of all treatments sprouted within 30 days after transfer to the higher temperature. The growth of all plants was about the same, except that those which received the highest concentration of growth-regulator were severely stunted.

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