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A Cytological Study of Celosia argentea, C. argentea var. Cristata, and Their Hybrids

William F. Grant
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 115, No. 4 (Jun., 1954), pp. 323-336
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2473317
Page Count: 14
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A Cytological Study of Celosia argentea, C. argentea var. Cristata, and Their Hybrids
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Abstract

1. Cockscomb (Celosia argentea var. cristata), C. argentea, an almost sterile hybrid between them, and eight F2 plants raised from seed from the hybrid have been studied cytologically. The hybrid possessed a chromosome number (2n = 54) intermediate between those of the parents (2n = 36 and 72 for cockscomb and C. argentea, respectively). The parents exhibited typical meiotic pairing, and no irregularities were observed. A cross between these species has been previously reported by Wakakuwa (21), who described the meiotic behavior of the hybrid. Of the eight F2 plants investigated in this study, somatic chromosome numbers of 54 (three plants), 81 (one plant), and 108 (four plants) were observed. Atypical meiotic behavior was found in all F2 plants. 2. Aberrations in microsporogenesis resulted in many types of microspores. An estimate of the percentage fertility of all plants is given. 3. Both stomatal and pollen-grain size were proportional to chromosome number and were found to be valuable criteria for distinguishing the polyploid plants in Celosia. 4. Twenty-six different types of fasciated cockscombs showed no difference in chromosome number. Fasciation in cockscomb must result from genic rather than from chromosome number differences. 5. Cockscomb is considered to have been incorrectly made a variety of C. argentea and should be reinstated as C. cristata L. 6. As a result of fasciations of the inflorescence, there is probably an insufficient number of flowers producing seed for cockscomb to maintain itself in nature.

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