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Studies on the Relation of Chemical Structure to Plant Growth-Regulator Activity in the Pineapple Plant. II. Compounds Related to Phenoxyalkylcarboxylic Acids, Phthalamic Acids, and Benzoic Acids

Donald P. Gowing and Robert W. Leeper
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 121, No. 4 (Jun., 1960), pp. 249-257
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2473425
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Studies on the Relation of Chemical Structure to Plant Growth-Regulator Activity in the Pineapple Plant. II. Compounds Related to Phenoxyalkylcarboxylic Acids, Phthalamic Acids, and Benzoic Acids
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Abstract

1. Results of testing 151 esters, amides, nitriles, amino acid, and other derivatives of phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids and related compounds for activity in flower induction ("forcing") and inhibition of flowering in pineapple, and toxicity to the plant, are given. The response in the split pea-stem curvature test is also recorded for most of the compounds. 2. In general, alkyl and terpenoid esters of 4-chloro-, 2,4-dichloro-, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids were active in forcing pineapple plants to flower. Many of them were inhibitory at higher concentrations but at the same time were somewhat toxic to the plant. 3. The ring-substituted phenylmercaptoacetic acids and substituted phenylglycines were inactive in forcing with one exception, a low percentage of forcing from 2,3-dimethylphenylglycine. 4. Derivatives of the DL- and L- non-aromatic amino acids were active in the pea test and forced pineapple; two D-amino acid derivatives forced pineapple despite a lack or low level of activity on pea. Tryptophan derivatives of 2,4-dichloro- or 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy-4-butyric acids failed to force pineapples, although several phenylalanine derivatives were active. 5. Of the 2,4-dichlorophenyl alkyl ethers tested, the n-propyl, ethyl, and methyl (2,4-dichloroanisole) ethers failed to force, although the n-hexyl, n-decyl, and n-tetradecyl ethers were active in forcing, as were the 2-chloroethyl and 2-methoxyethyl ethers. 6. Of the purified benzoic, salicylic, phthalic, or phthalamic acids, only 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid forced pineapples to flower, although a few were inhibitory and several toxic. TIBA (2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) was completely inactive in the forcing response. N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and two of its chlorinated derivatives produced monstrosities in fruit initiated following, but not in response to, application.

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