Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

On the Germination of Seeds of Comptonia peregrina, the Sweet Fern

Peter del Tredici and John G. Torrey
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 137, No. 3 (Sep., 1976), pp. 262-268
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2473860
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
On the Germination of Seeds of Comptonia peregrina, the Sweet Fern
Preview not available

Abstract

Fruits of the sweet fern, Comptonia peregrina (L) Coult., possess a hard, resistant, sclerified pericarp which surrounds a membranous seed coat or testa which in turn encloses the embryo. Scarification of the fruit, low-temperature treatment of moistened fruits, and a variety of chemical treatments failed to elicit seed germination. Treatment of the whole fruit with 500 ppm gibberellic acid (GA3) for up to 24 h elicited 20% germination, which increased to as high as 80% when combined with scarification. Mechanical removal of the pericarp did not allow germination; removal of both pericarp and the seed coat membranes resulted in good germination Best germination was obtained with isolated embryos treated with 1-10 ppm GA3. The age of the fruit in storage had no effect on development of the isolated embryo but did affect the response of intact seeds to treatment with GA3. Fruits of Myrica gale L. and M. cerifera L. showed improved germination following GA3 treatment. An inhibitor in the seed coat of Comptonia, possibly abscisic acid, was believed to be responsible for fruit dormancy in this plant.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268