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Journal Article

Natural Hybrids Between Sphenopholis obtusata and Trisetum pensylvanicum (Gramineae)

Edward E. Terrell, Arne W. Hovin and Helen D. Hill
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 92, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1965), pp. 169-182
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2483364
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2483364
Page Count: 14

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Topics: Hybridity, Plants, Herbaria, Glumes, Pollen, Inflorescences, Spikelets, Biological taxonomies, Ploidies, Awns
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Natural Hybrids Between Sphenopholis obtusata and Trisetum pensylvanicum (Gramineae)
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Abstract

Putative hybrids between Sphenopholis obtusata and Trisetum pensylvanicum were found growing with the presumed parental species at three localities in northeastern North Carolina. They were intergradient in gross morphological characteristics between the parents. Analysis of local population samples (mass collections) by pictorialized scatter diagrams and evidence about chromosome number, pollen stainability, and female fertility in artificial crosses further corroborated our belief that hybridization had occurred. Chromosome numbers in all taxa were 2n = 14; this is the first report on chromosome number in Trisetum pensylvanicum. The two parental species had 0 to 38% self-fertility. Satisfactory meiotic pairing in hybrids indicated a close relationship between the two parental species. The nomenclatural application of the name, Sphenopholis pallens (Muhl. ex Bieler) Scribner is discussed. This name has in the past been used to refer to hybrids of any of the species of Sphenopholis with Trisetum pensylvanicum.

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