Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Survey of Occurrences of Liquid or Soft Endosperm in Grass Genera

Edward E. Terrell
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 98, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1971), pp. 264-268
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2483625
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2483625
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Survey of Occurrences of Liquid or Soft Endosperm in Grass Genera
Preview not available

Abstract

Liquid endosperm is a viscous fluid containing starches, proteins, and a relatively high content of oils. This endosperm may remain liquid for 40-50 years and soft at least 125 years. In a survey of 169 grass genera belonging to approximately 30 tribes, 30 genera were found to have at least one species with liquid or soft endosperm. On the basis of the species sampled endosperm conditions in the genera are as follows: liquid-Dichelachne, Gaudinia, Gaudinopsis, Helictotrichon, Koeleria, Lagurus, Limnodea, Peyritschia, Sphenopholis, Trisetaria, Trisetum; semi-liquid-Apera, Arctagrostis, Cinna, Parapholis; soft-Airopsis, Ammochloa, Beckmannia, Dactylis, Erianthecium, Holcus, Lamarckia. More variation occurs in Agrostis (liquid to solid), Alopecurus (semi-liquid to soft), Briza (semi-liquid to solid), Calamagrostis (soft to solid), and Avena (soft to solid). Old collections of Pholiurus, Pilgerochloa, and Ventenata had soft endosperm. These 30 genera of the subfamily Festucoideae have been assigned by various authors to as few as four or as many as eight tribes. This study provides data supporting reassignment of certain genera so that all thirty are included in three tribes: Aveneae (including Agrostideae in part), Festuceae, and Monermeae.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268