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Secondary Succession and Soils on the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey

Jess Paul Hanks
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 98, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1971), pp. 315-321
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2483970
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2483970
Page Count: 7
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Secondary Succession and Soils on the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey
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Abstract

Old field succession on the inner coastal plain of New Jersey was investigated in one- to two-year-old fields and through the forest stage. The number of introduced species decreases through older age-groups. The number of native species shows a reciprocal increase through older age-groups. One- to two-year-old fields are dominated by Conyza canadensis and Anthemis arvensis. Ten- to 15-year-old fields are dominated by Solidago juncea and Andropogon virginicus. Rubus spp. are the most important shrubs in the 10- to 15-year-old fields. The 25- to 40-year-old fields are young forests, dominated by Liquidambar styraciflua and Acer rubrum. The forest stands are dominated by Fagus grandifolia, Liriodendron tulipifera and Acer rubrum. The area will probably support a mixed beech-oak forest given a suitable period of time for stabilization. Selected soil characteristics including pH, organic matter, magnesium, phosphorous calcium, and potassium content differed among successional age-groups. These differences are almost certainly the result of agricultural practices on the inner coastal plain. A considerable intei relationship among land use history, soil parameters, and old field succession exists on the area.

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