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Comparative Leaf Flavonoid Chemistry of Coreopsis nuecensoides and C. nuecensis (Compositae), a Progenitor-Derivative Species-Pair

Edwin B. Smith and Daniel J. Crawford
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 108, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1981), pp. 7-12
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2484331
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2484331
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Comparative Leaf Flavonoid Chemistry of Coreopsis nuecensoides and C. nuecensis (Compositae), a Progenitor-Derivative Species-Pair
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Abstract

Coreopsis nuecensoides and C. nuecensis represent a progenitor-derivative species pair with the latter having evolved from the former via chromosomal repatterning. The two species are reproductively isolated as a result of chromosomal translocations but are exceedingly similar morphologically. Their leaf flavonoid chemistries differ in several significant respects. Coreopsis nuecensis exhibits 6-methoxyflavonoids (6-methoxyluteolin 7-0-glucoside and 6-methoxyquercetin 7-0-glucoside), which are lacking in C. nuecensoides. The latter species contains flavonols (quercetin 3-0-glucoside and 3-0-rutinoside) and the flavone apigenin 7-0-glucoside, all of which are lacking in C. nuecensis except for a flavonol in one population. The divergent leaf flavonoid chemistries are hypothesized to be due either to accumulated genetic differences in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathways after chromosomal restructuring or a regulatory change in flavonoid biosynthesis associated with chromosomal repatterning. It is possible that both factors may have been involved in providing the rather striking chemical differences.

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