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Herbaceous Production in Cut-Burned, Uncut-Burned, and Control Areas of a Chamaecyparis thyoides (L.) BSP (Cupressaceae) Stand in the Great Dismal Swamp

Carol E. McKinley and Frank P. Day, Jr.
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 106, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1979), pp. 20-28
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2484376
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2484376
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Herbaceous Production in Cut-Burned, Uncut-Burned, and Control Areas of a Chamaecyparis thyoides (L.) BSP (Cupressaceae) Stand in the Great Dismal Swamp
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Abstract

The biomass and productivity of the herbaceous layer in distinct areas of a Chamaecyparis thyoides (L.) BSP (Atlantic white cedar) stand in the Great Dismal Swamp were estimated by sampling along three transects. The transects were located in cut-burned, uncut-burned, and control areas. The harvest method was used and productivity estimated by summing peak biomass of individual species. The cut-burned area had the highest productivity (3475 kg ha-1 yr-1) and was characterized by species of the Asteraceae, Poaceae, and Cyperaceae. The un-cut burned area had a productivity of 1636 kg ha-1 yr-1 with species of the Asteraceae but lacking the grasses and sedges. The control area exhibited the lowest productivity (365 kg ha-1 yr-1) and had few herbaceous species. The fire opened the overstory resulting in higher productivity in the two burned areas.

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