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Convolvulus sepium in Old Field Succession on the New Jersey Piedmont

James A. Quinn
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 101, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1974), pp. 89-95
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2484540
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2484540
Page Count: 7
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Convolvulus sepium in Old Field Succession on the New Jersey Piedmont
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Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the possibility that allelopathic and autotoxic phenomena influence the results of competitive interactions between Convolvulus sepium and associated species on the Piedmont of New Jersey. Field observations and greenhouse experiments were performed on the effects of soil from patches of C. sepium on germination and growth and the effects of leachate of this species on growth. Past reports and field observations indicated that (1) certain species growing in areas inhabited by C sepium appear inhibited even during its dormant period and even after hand-weeding removes it as a competitor, and (2) when initially dominant, the species often declines in importance during the early stages of old field succession. Allelopathic effects of C. sepium varied with the species tested. Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album, Digitaria sanguinalis, and Triticum aestivum were significantly inhibited at all stages of development investigated. Portulaca oleracea was inhibited only during germination and seedling development. Autotoxicity was statistically significant in all controlled environment studies. The interaction of such allelopathic and autotoxic effects in the early stages of secondary succession is discussed.

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