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The Persuasive Effect of Source Credibility: Tests of Cognitive Response

Brian Sternthal, Ruby Dholakia and Clark Leavitt
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 4, No. 4 (Mar., 1978), pp. 252-260
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2488816
Page Count: 9
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The Persuasive Effect of Source Credibility: Tests of Cognitive Response
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Abstract

Two experiments are reported identifying the circumstances in which high credibility either facilitates, inhibits, or has no effect on the communicator's persuasiveness in relation to a less credible source. These data provide support for the cognitive response view of information processing and suggest the importance of message recipient's initial opinion as a determinant of persuasion.

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