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Designing Research for Application

Bobby J. Calder, Lynn W. Phillips and Alice M. Tybout
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 8, No. 2 (Sep., 1981), pp. 197-207
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2488831
Page Count: 11
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Designing Research for Application
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Abstract

Two distinct types of generalizability are identified in consumer research. One entails the application of specific effects, whereas the other entails the application of general scientific theory. Effects application and theory application rest on different philosophical assumptions, and have different methodological implications. A failure to respect these differences has led to much confusion, regarding issues such as the appropriateness of student subjects and laboratory settings.

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