If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Salience of Relevant Others and Its Effect on Individual and Joint Preferences: An Experimental Investigation

Lakshman Krishnamurthi
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 10, No. 1 (Jun., 1983), pp. 62-72
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2488856
Page Count: 11
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Salience of Relevant Others and Its Effect on Individual and Joint Preferences: An Experimental Investigation
Preview not available

Abstract

This article offers an approach to joint decision making that is an extension of the key informant approach. MBAs and their household partners were either prompted to or told not to take each other into consideration in stating their preferences for MBA jobs. The household partners came significantly closer to representing the joint position as a result of the prompt than did the MBAs; they were also more accurate in their perception of the other group's preferences. It is concluded that a key informant's awareness that a decision is joint does not by itself enhance his/her accuracy in predicting joint preferences; rather, accuracy depends on a key informant's knowledge of the other's preferences.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72