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Brand Choice Behavior as a Function of Information Load: Replication and Extension

Jacob Jacoby, Donald E. Speller and Carol Kohn Berning
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Jun., 1974), pp. 33-42
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2488952
Page Count: 10
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Brand Choice Behavior as a Function of Information Load: Replication and Extension
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Abstract

The hypothesis that finite limits exist to the amount of information consumers can effectively use was tested by operationalizing information load in terms of number of brands and amount of information per brand provided. The results of an experiment involving 192 housewives tend to confirm this hypothesis.

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