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Highly Credible Sources: Persuasive Facilitators or Persuasive Liabilities?

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Brian Sternthal
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 3, No. 4 (Mar., 1977), pp. 223-232
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2489608
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Highly Credible Sources: Persuasive Facilitators or Persuasive Liabilities?
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Abstract

A low credibility source induced a more positive attitude toward his advocacy than did a highly credible source when message recipients' own behavior served as a cue for determining their attitudes. In contrast, when the behavioral cue was absent, a highly credible source did not have an adverse effect on individuals' attitudes or behavior. These findings are interpreted in terms of self-perception theory and cognitive response analysis.

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