If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Mental Budgeting and Consumer Decisions

Chip Heath and Jack B. Soll
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jun., 1996), pp. 40-52
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2489664
Page Count: 13
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Mental Budgeting and Consumer Decisions
Preview not available

Abstract

Consumers often set budgets for categories of expenses (e.g., entertainment) and track expenses against their budget. Because budgets cannot perfectly anticipate consumption opportunities, people may earmark too much or too little money for a particular category. This leads them to overconsume or underconsume goods in that category. The results of three studies suggest that consumers do indeed set budgets and that budgeting may lead to underconsumption. To show that consumers track expenses, the studies demonstrate that budgeting effects are larger for purchases that are highly typical of their category. Such purchases reduce the amount people spend in a category and block the purchase of other typical items. The studies control for satiation and income effects; thus, budgeting adds predictive power to standard economic consumer theory.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52