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Effects of Self-Referencing on Persuasion

Robert E. Burnkrant and H. Rao Unnava
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 22, No. 1 (Jun., 1995), pp. 17-26
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2489697
Page Count: 10
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Effects of Self-Referencing on Persuasion
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Abstract

Two experiments manipulate self-referencing by varying copy writing strategy. It is found that increasing self-referencing increases message elaboration and can increase persuasion when message arguments are strong However, when self-referencing is increased in the presence of other variables that also enhance elaboration, the favorable effect of self-referencing on persuasion is moderated or reversed. A two-factor explanation is employed to generate predictions and account for results.

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