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Perceived Usefulness, Ease of Use, and Usage of Information Technology: A Replication

Dennis A. Adams, R. Ryan Nelson and Peter A. Todd
MIS Quarterly
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 227-247
DOI: 10.2307/249577
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/249577
Page Count: 21
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Perceived Usefulness, Ease of Use, and Usage of Information Technology: A Replication
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Abstract

This paper presents the findings of two studies that replicate previous work by Fred Davis on the subject of perceived usefulness, ease of use, and usage of information technology. The two studies focus on evaluating the psychometric properties of the ease of use and usefulness scales, while examining the relationship between ease of use, usefulness, and system usage. Study 1 provides a strong assessment of the convergent validity of the two scales by examining heterogeneous user groups dealing with heterogeneous implementations of messaging technology. In addition, because one might expect users to share similar perspectives about voice and electronic mail, the study also represents a strong test of discriminant validity. In this study a total of 118 respondents from 10 different organizations were surveyed for their attitudes toward two messaging technologies: voice and electronic mail. Study 2 complements the approach taken in Study 1 by focusing on the ability to demonstrate discriminant validity. Three popular software applications (WordPerfect, Lotus 1-2-3, and Harvard Graphics) were examined based on the expectation that they would all be rated highly on both scales. In this study a total of 73 users rated the three packages in terms of ease of use and usefulness. The results of the studies demonstrate reliable and valid scales for measurement of perceived ease of use and usefulness. In addition, the paper tests the relationships between ease of use, usefulness, and usage using structural equation modelling. The results of this model are consistent with previous research for Study 1, suggesting that usefulness is an important determinant of system use. For Study 2 the results are somewhat mixed, but indicate the importance of both ease of use and usefulness. Differences in conditions of usage are explored to explain these findings.

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