Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Review: Tabanidae of the East Coast as an Economic Problem

Elton J. Hansens
Journal of the New York Entomological Society
Vol. 87, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 312-318
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25009178
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Review: Tabanidae of the East Coast as an Economic Problem
Preview not available

Abstract

Tabanidae are pests of man and animals in many areas of the coastal states but especially near salt marshes. The major species, Tabanus nigrovittatus and Chrysops atlanticus, move from the marshes to nearby beaches, camp grounds, golf courses, and other recreational areas and onto boats in the bays and estuaries. Chrysops congregate in dense vegetation and attack when humans or animals move into such places. Both Tabanus and Chrysops are severe problems to agricultural workers when the flies are numerous. Livestock are readily attacked by Tabanidae with consequent effects on thriftiness, weight gains and milk production and possible transmission of causal agents of disease. Biology and habits of both salt marsh and upland species are poorly known. Probably T. nigrovittatus is a species complex. Controls are inadequate though traps and vegetative barriers have been shown useful against Tabanus and some insecticides have given reduction but not adequate control of both Tabanus and Chrysops.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[312]
    [312]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318