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Eutrophication of Surface Water: Lake Tahoe

E. J. Middlebrooks, E. A. Pearson, M. Tunzi, A. Adinarayana, P. H. McGauhey and G. A. Rohlich
Journal (Water Pollution Control Federation)
Vol. 43, No. 2 (Feb., 1971), pp. 242-251
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25036890
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Eutrophication of Surface Water: Lake Tahoe
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Abstract

Although nitrogen and phosphorous are major factors in the nutrient-rich, or eutrophic condition that leads to algal blooms, their presence is not always the critical factor in eutrophication. The authors make an effort to develop suitable methods of assaying the algal growth-stimulating potential of various influents to lakes and streams and to apply these methods to an evaluation of their ability to increase the eutrophication of water. A test algae, Selenastrum gracile, was used to assess quantitatively biostimulation by exposure to surface runoff, seepages, effluents from various wastewater treatment processes, and Lake Tahoe (Calif.) water. Initial growth response to the test algae was much greater with batch-type assay data than with steady-state conditions. Both batch and continuous flow assays indicated that the biostimulatory properties of secondary effluents were much greater than that from raw or primary treated wastes. Wastewater effluents of all types showed higher growth response rates than could be accounted for by the amount of N and P present in the samples.

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