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Some Effects of Dustfall on Urban Stormwater Quality

Michael P. Barkdoll, Donald E. Overton and Roger P. Betson
Journal (Water Pollution Control Federation)
Vol. 49, No. 9, Fiftieth Annual Conference (Sep., 1977), pp. 1976-1984
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25039389
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Effects of Dustfall on Urban Stormwater Quality
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Abstract

Runoff from 47 storms in a small urban watershed was analysed for 16 water contaminants. Dustfall was also collected and analysed. There were two distinct but overlapping groups of contaminants found in the stormwater quality analysis. Minerals and solids had relatively constant concentrations from storm to storm, whereas, heavy metals, nutrients, and chemical oxygen demand had decreasing concentrations with increasing stormwater discharge. Further, chemical oxygen demand, Hg, Cl, Pb, ${\rm SiO}_{2}$, ${\rm PO}_{4}$, and As significantly influence stormwater quality. Chemical oxygen demand, Hg, Q, As, and ${\rm PO}_{4}$ are primarily caused by dustfall. The relative influence of dustfall for other constituents will have to be verified by further study. Previous area in urban watersheds should not be disregarded in determining pollutant yields. Models using only street surface contaminants will yield conservative results. Removal was found to be a function of storm runoff volume and only mildly affected by runoff rates. Certain pollutants such as suspended solids, Ca, Mg, ${\rm SO}_{4}$, and ${\rm CaCO}_{3}$ are available in extremely large quantities. These constituents probably arise from the erosion of disturbed land areas.

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