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The Optimal Design of Fluidized Bed Bioreactors

G. Andrews and R. Trapasso
Journal (Water Pollution Control Federation)
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Feb., 1985), pp. 143-150
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25042545
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Optimal Design of Fluidized Bed Bioreactors
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Abstract

This analysis of a supported-film fluidized-bed bioreactor considers substrate uptake rate and the particle settling velocity as functions of film thickness, and the balance between mixing and stratification of the particles in the bed. Using two-phase kinetics to describe uptake in the film, equations are derived for the film thickness that maximizes the substrate uptake rate per unit particle volume. Because this thickness increases with substrate concentration, support particles should be light (SG ≈ 1.05) so that stratification will position the thickest films near the base of the bed where concentrations are highest. With conventional heavy particles like sand, settling velocity decreases with film thickness so heavily coated particles are more likely to be near the top of the bed. For aerobic beds where particle removal is necessary to remove excess biomass, the particles should be monosized and approximately 35 mesh to prevent excessive mass transfer resistance in the liquid. For anaerobic beds where no such removal is needed, a size distribution of approximately 35 × 40 mesh can be used to encourage stratification.

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