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Enhancement of Chemical-Oxygen Demand and Color Removal of Distillery Spent-Wash by Ozonation

S. Srivastava, P. Bose and V. Tare
Water Environment Research
Vol. 78, No. 4 (Apr., 2006), pp. 409-420
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25045993
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Enhancement of Chemical-Oxygen Demand and Color Removal of Distillery Spent-Wash by Ozonation
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Abstract

Distillery spent-wash has very high organic content (75 000 to 125 000 mg/L chemical-oxygen demand [COD]), color, and contains difficult-to-biodegrade organic compounds. For example, anaerobic treatment of the distillery spent-wash used in this study resulted in 60% COD reduction and low color removal. Subsequent aerobic treatment of the anaerobic effluent resulted in enhancement of COD removal to 66%. In this paper, the effect of ozonation on various properties of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent, including the effect on its subsequent aerobic biodegradation, was investigated. Ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at various ozone doses resulted in the reduction of total-organic carbon (TOC), COD, COD/TOC ratio, absorbance, color, and increase in the biochemical-oxygen demand (BOD)/COD ratio of the effluent. Further, ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at an ozone dose of 2.08 mg/mg initial TOC and subsequent aerobic biodegradation resulted in 87.4% COD removal, as compared to 66% removal when ozonation was not used.

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