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Fate of the Detergent Builder, Sodium Polyglyoxylate, in Wastewater Treatment

Jae K. Park, David Jenkins, T. M. Holsen, T. W. Warnock and William E. Gledhill
Journal (Water Pollution Control Federation)
Vol. 61, No. 4 (Apr., 1989), pp. 491-499
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25046964
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fate of the Detergent Builder, Sodium Polyglyoxylate, in Wastewater Treatment
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Abstract

Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of a potential polyphosphate substitute, sodium polyglyoxlate (SPG), in synthetic detergents during sewer transport, primary sedimentation, activated sludge, anaerobic digestion, and sludge dewatering. SPG removal from typical domestic wastewater was influenced by SPG distribution between dissolved and suspended states. Suspended SPG species were removed proportionally with suspended solids during primary sedimentation. Suspended SPG escaping primary sedimentation became incorporated into the activated sludge and was removed with the waste activated sludge. Significant SPG hydrolysis and biodegradation occurs during anaerobic digestion of the sludges with a hydraulic retention time of 20 d: 37% of the SPG carbon was converted to ${\rm CH}_{4}$ and ${\rm CO}_{2}$. It was estimated that 10% sludge SPG biodegraded during a 10-day drying period in a sludge drying bed. For shorter sludge drying times and for mechanical dewatering no biodegradation can be assumed. Materials balance calculations indicate SPG removals of 67 to 76% of which 22 to 27% of influent SPG remained in dried digested sludge.

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