Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

When, How, and with What Success? The Joint Effect of Entry Timing and Entry Mode on Survival of Japanese Subsidiaries in China

Veronika Papyrina
Journal of International Marketing
Vol. 15, No. 3 (2007), pp. 73-95
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25049091
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($24.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
When, How, and with What Success? The Joint Effect of Entry Timing and Entry Mode on Survival of Japanese Subsidiaries in China
Preview not available

Abstract

This study examines the question whether joint ventures or wholly owned subsidiaries are more likely to survive in the context of Japanese subsidiaries in China. The author suggests that the answer to this question depends on the time the subsidiary was established. Specifically, it is argued that joint ventures founded during the early stage of institutional reforms are more likely to survive than wholly owned subsidiaries set up at that time, and vice versa for subsidiaries established in the late phase of institutional reforms. The rationale for these propositions is that at the beginning of market-oriented reforms, contributions provided by local partners make shared ownership an optimal entry mode strategy, whereas a relatively stable regulatory framework in the late stage of institutional reforms enables the firm to realize benefits associated with sole ownership more efficiently. Empirical evidence supports both propositions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95