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On the Use of Motor Vehicles in Crop-Cutting Survey and a Sampling of the Road-Side Plots Only

J. M. Sengupta
Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics, Series B (1960-2002)
Vol. 27, No. 1/2 (Sep., 1965), pp. 159-174
Published by: Springer on behalf of the Indian Statistical Institute
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25051536
Page Count: 16
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On the Use of Motor Vehicles in Crop-Cutting Survey and a Sampling of the Road-Side Plots Only
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Abstract

Analysis of the crop-cutting material collected by the Indian Statistical Institute in the three years 1947-48 to 1949-50 on winter paddy relating to 50 Police Stations in West Bengal, did not reveal the existence of any trend in the yield rate of paddy in individual fields with their distances from the nearest road sides. In absence any such trend, sampling of the road-side plots only which may be easily approached on wheeled vechicles, may enable us to get practically unbiassed estimates of yield rate and thus solve the greatest difficulty in crop-cutting experiments, where speed and mobility is an essential requirement. This however calls for further studies and on other crops in different types of terrains, before a reasonable conclusion can be arrived at. A crop-cutting scheme adopting three types of units, namely, (a) a foot-unit, where the investigators operate on foot, (b) a cycle-unit, employing cyclist investigators, (c) a motor-unit, the investigator being equipped with a motor vechicle, were tried out in Birbhum district of West Bengal. The weather and prevailing road conditions were abnormally bad and the scheme could not be completed exactly as planned. And yet, the results broadly indicate that against about 6 villages per month on foot and 10 villages per month on a cycle within a coverage of 500 sq. miles, a motor unit can cruise over an area of 2000 sq. miles and deal with 25 villages in the same time with a similar load of work to be attended to per village. Obviously, such a mechanised scheme has to be integrated into a multi-purpose one, to be economic and effective over the entire year. A collaboration with the government in utilising the services of departmental vechicles may be a possible solution for this important problem, namely, a quick ascertainment of the food position.

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