Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

New Technologies and Language Change: Toward an Anthropology of Linguistic Frontiers

Susan E. Cook
Annual Review of Anthropology
Vol. 33 (2004), pp. 103-115
Published by: Annual Reviews
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25064847
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
New Technologies and Language Change: Toward an Anthropology of Linguistic Frontiers
Preview not available

Abstract

Research to date on the relationship between new communications technologies and language emphasizes linguistic and social differences between online and off-line interactions and the impact of global English on the non-English-speaking world. These studies conclude, for the most part, that computer-mediated communication reproduces the social, political, and economic relations that exist in the real world. Related areas of research, including ethnographies of global hip hop and studies of urban hybrid language varieties, offer important models for using anthropological approaches to advance our understanding of the interconnections and situated-ness, of language, new technologies, global media, and social change.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115