Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Teaching Ethics without Ethics to Teach

Archie J. Bahm
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 1, No. 1 (Feb., 1982), pp. 43-47
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25071305
Page Count: 5
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Teaching Ethics without Ethics to Teach
Preview not available

Abstract

Changes in American society have brought both increased concern for solving practical problems and decreased concern for whether foundational ethical theory can be, or needs to be, understood when solving them. A systematic study of newly established institutes of applied ethics reveals that the directors of all of them claim that ethical theory, or knowledge of the ultimate bases for moral appeals inherent in human nature, is not necessary for proposing solutions. Quotations from claims of directors of five prominent institutes are cited as evidence for the thesis that teaching applied ethics without teaching theoretical foundations of ethics is the 'main line' policy today.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[43]
    [43]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47