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Context, Values and Moral Dilemmas: Comparing the Choices of Business and Law School Students

Donald L. McCabe, Janet M. Dukerich and Jane E. Dutton
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 10, No. 12 (Dec., 1991), pp. 951-960
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25072236
Page Count: 10
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Context, Values and Moral Dilemmas: Comparing the Choices of Business and Law School Students
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Abstract

Much has been written about the ethics and values of today's business student, but this research has generally been characterized by a variety of methodological shortcomings - the use of convenience samples, a failure to establish the relevance of comparison groups employed, attempts to understand behavior in terms of unidimensional values preselected by the researcher, and the lack of well-designed longitudinal studies. The research reported here addresses many of these concerns by comparing the values and ethical decision making behavior of a large cohort of students entering an M. B. A. program to students entering law school. Using the Rokeach value survey and several ethical decision making vignettes, significant differences were found between the two groups which have important implications for both the business and legal professions and the education of their future leaders.

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