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Fetal Protection: Law, Ethics and Corporate Policy

Ira Sprotzer and Ilene V. Goldberg
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 11, No. 10 (Oct., 1992), pp. 731-735
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25072330
Page Count: 5
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Fetal Protection: Law, Ethics and Corporate Policy
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Abstract

Corporate fetal protection policies are designed to protect unborn children from exposure to harmful substances in the workplace. In recent years, a number of corporations have instituted fetal protection policies which excluded all fertile female employees from jobs which exposed them to hazardous substances. Critics argued that these policies discriminated against women, and several lawsuits were filed. The United States Supreme Court recently decided a case involving the fetal protection policy of Johnson Controls, Inc. This article will analyze the impact of the Supreme Court decision from a legal and ethical perspective. Practical guidelines for policies which protect the unborn and comply with the law will also be addressed.

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