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Why Students Take Elective Business Ethics Courses: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior

Donna M. Randall
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 13, No. 5 (May, 1994), pp. 369-378
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25072540
Page Count: 10
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Why Students Take Elective Business Ethics Courses: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior
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Abstract

Despite the prevalence of elective business ethics courses, little research has sought to explain and predict why some students enroll in these courses and while others do not. Using the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen and Madden, 1986) as a theoretical foundation, 178 graduate students in Ireland were surveyed about their intention to sign up for an elective ethics class. Their behavior was measured two months later. The results reveal the power of the theory of planned behavior to explain and predict who takes elective ethics classes.

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