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Ethics of Business Students: Some Marketing Perspectives

J. C. Lane
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 14, No. 7 (Jul., 1995), pp. 571-580
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25072674
Page Count: 10
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Ethics of Business Students: Some Marketing Perspectives
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Abstract

This study explores the reactions of 412 business students to a range of ethical marketing dilemmas. Reviewing some of the comparable Australian and U.S. research in the field, the study examines the ethical judgements for potential demographic differences. The findings suggest that a majority of students are prepared to act unethically in order to gain some competitive or personal advantage. Yielding the highest ethical response are situations of potential and significant social impact. The results support some previous research that shows the existence of gender and age differences in ethical response and likely behaviour. This (gender) difference was most divergent on the issue of portrayal of women in advertising. In particular, females and older students respond more ethically in a majority of situations. The research concludes a number of opportunities for new directions in education, public policy making and further research.

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