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Can Sexual Harassment Be Salvaged?

M. J. Booker
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 17, No. 11 (Aug., 1998), pp. 1171-1177
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25073948
Page Count: 7
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Can Sexual Harassment Be Salvaged?
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Abstract

Cases of sexual harassment have become increasingly common in the courts, but there is at present no coherent definition of just what sexual harassment is supposed to consist. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines ultimately focus on issues of subjective victimization, a standard which is overly broad and prescriptively empty. In order to salvage the concept of sexual harassment, it is argued here that the element of unwelcomeness must be removed from it. Instead of considering welcomeness, it is argued that sexual harassment can be given proscriptive clarity if it is delineated as gender harassment, coercive sexual harassment, and presumptive sexual harassment.

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