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Attempting to Institutionalize Ethics: Case Studies from Japan

Chiaki Nakano
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Feb., 1999), pp. 335-343
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25074058
Page Count: 9
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Attempting to Institutionalize Ethics: Case Studies from Japan
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Abstract

A series of survey studies on corporations' institutionalization of ethics has been done in the U.S. and Japan. Among them, one Japanese study suggests that company policy is the most influential factor in managers' ethical decision-making and behavior. This empirical evidence suggests that, in Japan, company efforts to institutionalize ethics are effective in improving business behavior. The author examines this by describing three case studies of Japanese managers' ethical decision-making.

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