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Pharmaceutical Advertisements: How They Deceive Patients

Ashish Chandra and Gary A. Holt
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 18, No. 4 (Feb., 1999), pp. 359-366
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25074060
Page Count: 8
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Pharmaceutical Advertisements: How They Deceive Patients
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Abstract

Pharmaceutical advertising is one of the most important kinds of advertising that can have a direct impact on the health of a consumer. Hence, this necessitates the fact that it is essential for advertisers of such products to take special care and additional responsibility when devising the promotional strategies of these products. In reality, it has been observed that pharmaceutical product advertisers often promoted their products to achieve their own goals at the potential risk of having an adverse effect on the consumer's health. This type of advertising is most often seen in over-the-counter drug product advertisements, and not as often in the case of prescription drug advertisements, which is relatively new. This article analyzes various purposes of advertising pharmaceutical products and also the potential problems that arise from the way pharmaceutical products have quite frequently been promoted.

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