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The Ten Commandments Perspective on Power and Authority in Organizations

Abbas J. Ali, Robert C. Camp and Manton Gibbs
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 26, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 351-361
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25074352
Page Count: 11
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The Ten Commandments Perspective on Power and Authority in Organizations
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Abstract

Power and authority in terms of the Ten Commandments (TCs) are discussed. The paper reviews the TCs in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The treatment and basis for power and authority in each religion are clarified. Implications of power and authority using the perspective of the TCs are provided. The paper suggests that in today's business environment people tend to be selective in identifying only with certain elements of the TCs that fit their interest and that the TCs should be viewed as general moral guidelines.

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