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An Empirical Investigation of the Influence of Selected Personal, Organizational and Moral Intensity Factors on Ethical Decision Making

Joseph G. P. Paolillo and Scott J. Vitell
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 35, No. 1 (Jan., 2002), pp. 65-74
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25074655
Page Count: 10
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An Empirical Investigation of the Influence of Selected Personal, Organizational and Moral Intensity Factors on Ethical Decision Making
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Abstract

This exploratory study of ethical decision making by individuals in organizations found moral intensity, as defined by Jones (1991), to significantly influence ethical decision making intentions of managers. Moral intensity explained 37% and 53% of the variance in ethical decision making in two decision-making scenarios. In part, the results of this research support our theoretical understanding of ethical/unethical decision-making and serve as a foundation for future research.

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