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Social Investing: Mainstream or Backwater?

Thomas W. Dunfee
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 43, No. 3, Social Screening of Investments (Mar., 2003), pp. 247-252
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25074995
Page Count: 6
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Social Investing: Mainstream or Backwater?
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Abstract

Social investing, though not yet fully mainstream, has the potential to obtain such status. Questions relating to the future of social investing include the following. (1) What properly falls within the ambit of social investing? Assuming that no single definition of social responsibility is feasible, what then are the limits? (2) What do we need to know about investor psychology concerning social investing? What motivates people to buy socially screened investments and why do they sometimes act inconsistently? (3) How can we improve the measures of social performance? Is it possible to develop GAAP and GAAS equivalents for social reporting? (4) Should social reports by firms be audited? If so, how? (5) What sorts of public policies are necessary to support the social screening of investments?

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