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Beetles Associated with Atta and Acromyrmex Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Attini)

José Luis Navarrete-Heredia
Transactions of the American Entomological Society (1890-)
Vol. 127, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 381-429
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25078753
Page Count: 49
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Beetles Associated with Atta and Acromyrmex Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Attini)
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Abstract

Attini ants form a monophyletic group restricted to America. Atta and Acromyrmex are distributed from the United States south to South America excluding Chile and some of the West Indies. This paper provides new records in addition to the compilation of published information on the beetles associated with those ant genera, including a checklist. There are records for 411 species of beetles associated with Atta and/or Acromyrmex. They belong to 25 families: Carabidae (14 genera/17 species), Hydrophilidae (3/5), Histeridae (18/61), Ptiliidae (3/7), Scydmaenidae (5/8), Staphylinidae (60/141), Passalidae (3/4), Ochodaeidae (1/3), Ceratocanthidae (1/3), Scarabaeidae (33/111), Elateridae (3/6), Lycidae (1/1), Dermestidae (1/1), Anobiidae (1/1), Nitidulidae (2/3), Monotomidae (1/1), Phalacridae (1/1), Cerylonidae (1/3), Endomychidae (1/1), Colydiidae (1/1), Tenebrionidae (10/17), Anthicidae (1/1), Cerambycidae (1/1), Chrysomelidae (7/9) and Curculionidae (3/4). Glenus aureicollis Wasmann, 1902 (not Wasmann, 1925) is synonymized under Glenus regalis Erichson, 1840. Attini-beetle relationships evolved several times within the Order Coleoptera. Permanent beetles are associated with ant debris and/or in fungus chamber; however there is no evidence of direct interactions with the hosts. Most species are associated either with Atta or Acromyrmex, but there are a few species recorded from both genera. Based on the phylogeny of the ants, Attini-beetle relationships are recent ecological interactions, but those with Acromyrmex are older than the ones observed with Atta.

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