Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Nesting Biology of the Eastern Yellowjacket, Vespula maculifrons (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)

J. F. MacDonald and R. W. Matthews
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 54, No. 3 (Jul., 1981), pp. 433-457
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25084177
Page Count: 25
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Nesting Biology of the Eastern Yellowjacket, Vespula maculifrons (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
Preview not available

Abstract

The eastern yellowjacket, Vespula maculifrons (Buysson), was the most abundant yellowjacket species in northern Georgia, western North Carolina and west central Indiana in all habitats studied from 1974-1977. Nearly every colony was subterranean; only a few were discovered in protected above ground sites. A "typical" colony in our southeastern sites was initiated by early May, grew rapidly during July and August reaching a peak worker population of nearly 3000 in September, and constructed about 8000 cells of which nearly 30% produced queens. Queen cell construction was initiated as early as 18 August and continued through November with adult queens emerging from late September until colony demise in December. For completed nests the mean number of worker cells was 5283 and the mean number of queen cells was 2551, but the ratio of queen to total cells ranged from 17.5 to 42.4%. The largest nest had 14,105 total cells, and the maximum numbers of adult workers in a colony when sampled was 4875. Very few established colonies reached maturity. Of 36 incipient colonies observed in situ in Athens, Georgia, only 2 developed to produce queens. Inundation following spring rain, loss of queen, and undocumented causes accounted for the demise of 31 colonies; 3 colonies were usurped by other Vespula species. Intraspecific usurpation was documented in 13 colonies. The socially parasitic southern yellowjacket, V. squamosa (Drury), was a major mortality factor of early season V. maculifrons colonies; of 240 host colonies established in our southeastern study sites, 96 (40%) eventually were usurped by V. squamosa. Declining colonies characteristically supported larvae of 2 muscid flies, Fannia canicularis (L.) and Dendrophaonia querceti (Bouche), and those in advanced decline often harbored adult female Triphleba lugubris Meigen (Diptera: Phoridae). Numerous mature and declining colonies were destroyed by raccoons and black bear, but most such colonies had already produced large numbers of queens.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[433]
    [433]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451
  • Thumbnail: Page 
452
    452
  • Thumbnail: Page 
453
    453
  • Thumbnail: Page 
454
    454
  • Thumbnail: Page 
455
    455
  • Thumbnail: Page 
456
    456
  • Thumbnail: Page 
457
    457
Part of Sustainability