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Provisioning by Female Western Cicada Killer Wasps, Sphecius grandis (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae): Influence of Body Size and Emergence Time on Individual Provisioning Success

Jon Hastings
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 59, No. 2 (Apr., 1986), pp. 262-268
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25084766
Page Count: 7
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Provisioning by Female Western Cicada Killer Wasps, Sphecius grandis (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae): Influence of Body Size and Emergence Time on Individual Provisioning Success
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Abstract

The ability of individual female Sphecius grandis to provide cicadas for their offspring is influenced by their body size and date of emergence. Females with a forewing length of 29-30 mm are more successful providers than smaller individuals. Females with a forewing length of less than 25 mm have virtually no provisioning success. Female wasps emerge over a 3-4 week period in July and August. Females emerging in midseason have the highest provisioning success possibly because they are active during peak prey abundance. A slight male bias in the cicada provisions was observed. Though female cicadas contain more consumable tissue than male cicadas, males are apparently easier to locate and are therefore more frequently captured.

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