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Notes on the Nesting Biology of Andrena (Melandrena) nivalis Smith (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae)

E. R. Miliczky, D. F. Mayer and J. D. Lunden
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 63, No. 1 (Jan., 1990), pp. 166-174
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25085157
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Notes on the Nesting Biology of Andrena (Melandrena) nivalis Smith (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae)
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Abstract

Andrena (Melandrena) nivalis Smith constructed multicellular nests of moderate depth (up to 40 cm). Main burrows descended vertically, or nearly so, and meandered only slightly. Cells were located 8-10 cm horizontal distance from the vertical part of the main burrow and had their long axes subhorizontal to slightly inclined. Provision masses varied markedly in size but in all cases were flattened spheres of nectar-moistened pollen. The obliquely truncate posterior end of the egg was attached well to the rear of the provision mass and may have been glued in place. A. nivalis, a polylectic bee, visited pears (Pyrus communis L.) and appeared to be an effective pollinator, but adult flight activity was not in close synchrony with pear bloom during 1987 or 1988. Male bees spent the night in protected locations and sometimes excavated short sleeping burrows for this purpose. Three species of the bee genus Nomada (Anthophoridae) and an anthomyiid fly were found at the nesting site.

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