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Factors Affecting the Design of Traps for Stored-Product Insects

A. V. Barak, W. E. Burkholder and D. L. Faustini
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 63, No. 4 (Oct., 1990), pp. 466-485
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25085213
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Factors Affecting the Design of Traps for Stored-Product Insects
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Abstract

The availability of pheromones for many species of stored-product insects and the need to eliminate or greatly reduce the levels of insect infestation and contamination has led to increased interest in the development of traps for detecting and monitoring these insects. Traps have been developed for aerial insects (mainly pyralid moths and anobiids), for crawling stages of Coleoptera (Trogoderma, Tribolium and Oryzaephilus spp.) and for insertion into bulk grain for a complex of grain-infesting Coleoptera. Traps for aerial insects are most commonly sticky traps and funnel traps, modified to function in environments which may be dusty and which are observed by the public. Many traps for crawling Coleoptera are of corrugated materials and are designed to cause insects seeking shelter to drop into devices or onto adhesive surfaces. Food-baited traps have also been used for crawling Coleoptera. Perforated probe traps for grain are pitfall drop traps which contain an internal collection device such as a funnel tube. Successful traps are refinements of simple devices which utilize basic behavior to trap insects. Traps, to be popular in the marketplace must be easy to use, maintain and assemble, be reliable, easily produced, and cost effective.

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