Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Violent Weather and Bees: Populations of the Barrier Island Endemic, Hesperapis oraria (Hymenoptera: Melittidae) Survive a Category 3 Hurricane

James H. Cane
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 1997), pp. 73-75
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25085754
Page Count: 3

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Bees, Hurricanes, Species, Insect nests, Insect pollination, Weather, Dunes, Biology, Opal, Gulfs
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Violent Weather and Bees: Populations of the Barrier Island Endemic, Hesperapis oraria (Hymenoptera: Melittidae) Survive a Category 3 Hurricane
Preview not available

Abstract

The vulnerability of non-social bee populations to climatic perturbations is poorly known. A ground-nesting bee, Hesperapis oraria (Melittidae), is an autumnal univoltine species restricted to coastal dunes of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Adults are active from late September to early October, during the bloom of its sole pollen host, Balduina angustifolia (Asteraceae). On October 4 1995, a class 3 hurricane, "Opal", struck the entire coastal range of this bee. Ten populations first censused during 1993-1994 had all persisted into 1996, having withstood sustained winds of 185 km/hr, 13-25 cm of rain, and up to a 4.3 m tidal surge topped by 3 m waves that resulted in prolonged saltwater inundation of its dune habitats. Natural and anthropogenic factors that might endanger fragmented populations of this species are discussed from a conservation perspective.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[73]
    [73]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75