If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Nesting Biology of the Solitary Digger Bee Habropoda depressa (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae) in Urban and Island Environments

John F. Barthell, Daniel M. Bromberger, Howell V. Daly and Robbin W. Thorp
Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Vol. 71, No. 2 (Apr., 1998), pp. 116-136
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25085826
Page Count: 21
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Nesting Biology of the Solitary Digger Bee Habropoda depressa (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae) in Urban and Island Environments
Preview not available

Abstract

The nesting biology of Habropoda depressa Fowler is described for urban (University of California at Berkeley) and island (Santa Cruz Island) populations in the state of California (USA). This protandrous species is common in the California foothills where adults are active from late February through early June. Larvae do not spin cocoons and pupate to overwinter as adults by November. A portion of the population appears to delay development since prepupae were found in nest excavations early in the nesting season. Brood cells were parasitized mostly by two dipterans: bombyliid flies and an anthomyiid species, Leucophora fusca Huckett (found only on SCI). Unlike its congeners which nest in sandy soils, H. depressa nests in hard-packed soils, including clay. During the nesting season, females spend evenings outside burrows, roosting on nearby vegetation before returning to their nest the following morning. At the urban locale, female bees subsist almost entirely upon exotic and horticultural plant varieties while the majority of host plant collection records at Santa Cruz Island were from native species. On average, nests made by bees at UCB were significantly shorter than those constructed at SCI, although the average number of cells per nest was greater. These foraging and nest architectural differences may reflect either variation among populations or adaptations to urbanization effects of the last century.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[116]
    [116]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133
  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136